Get Ready for the SAT and ACT – Private Tutoring in Houston, Texas

Who cares about your test scores, anyway? Well…

  • Colleges do, and not just for admissions – they also use your scores to place you out of basic freshman classes (which can save you lots of money down the road)
  • Scholarships do – there’s free money for college, but it may depend on your test scores
  • Your future boss does – many companies request your test scores on your job application now, even if you’ve been out of college for more than 10 years

Are you prepared to get your best score?

If you haven’t taken the SAT or ACT before, or if you want to increase your overall score more than 250 points (SAT) or 4 points (ACT), you should start preparing three months before your test date!  If you’re close to your goal score, you should begin your re-preparation no later than 6 weeks before your test.  Test strategies are pretty easy to grasp, but your brain needs some time to absorb your practice (a.k.a. homework) and allow you to use your new strategies with confidence on test day.

Score Boosting Test Preparation in Houston

If you’re in the Houston area and ready to start studying for the SAT or ACT, contact me today!  Get a group of your friends together for group test preparation, or take advantage of custom one-on-one tutoring.  I can also help you start the school year with a new edge in math, English, and nearly any other high school subject.

College Essays – Don’t Put Them Off Too Long!

I also help with college essays! The fall of your senior year is full of activities – some fun ones like homecoming, and others like your college applications, tests and quizzes, and the boatload of homework you will complete before winter break.  Give yourself a break and get started on your college application essays now.  I can meet with you for as little as one hour a week and help you write an attention-grabbing, star-quality essay that will leave you plenty of free time.

My dog, practicing for his SIT exam.

My dog, practicing for his SIT exam.


 

Come back each day (or subscribe) for explanations of the daily practice questions provided by the makers of the SAT and ACT, along with tips to succeed on your test and in school.

Need more help than what I’ve posted? Send me an email to ask a question or request tutoring.  I provide private and small group tutoring in Houston for the ACT, SAT, and more.

Be sure to check out the helpful links on the right side, too, for more free test prep resources!

-Elizabeth

SAT Question of the Day Explained – July 30 2015 – Math, Number Concepts, Factors, Divisibility

Today’s SAT question of the day: All numbers divisible by both 4 and 15 are also divisible by which of the following?

Divisibility…what does it mean?  Just that a number can be divided evenly (no remainder) by another number.  For instance, 10 is evenly divisible by 5, but not by 7.  Got it?

Good.  Let’s tackle today’s divisibility questions.

Continue reading

SAT and ACT Vocabulary – Why It’s Important & How to Learn It

Straight to the point: improving your vocabulary helps you in these three ways on the SAT and ACT:

  1. You can recognize these new words and make the reading and writing/grammar sections much easier for yourself
  2. You can use the new “big” words in your essay and improve your score
  3. You can breeze through the sentence completions (SAT only), saving time and mental energy for the reading passages

Bonus: you can use these new words in your school assignments and college essays!

There are many ways to improve your vocab level, but here are my two favorite (“laziest”) ways to incorporate some new words into your life ASAP:

Most of my students find it easy to learn about 10 new words per week at the depth needed for these tests – so what are you waiting for?  Go elevate your linguistic knowledge – and your scores.

SAT Question of the Day Explained – January 4, 2015

Happy new year! Today’s SAT question of the day is a math question about stamps and envelopes.  How many more years before no one will know what those are??  Anyhow, the question is as follows:

A machine can insert letters in envelopes at the rate of 120 per minute. Another machine can stamp the envelopes at the rate of 3 per second. How many such stamping machines are needed to keep up with 18 inserting machines of this kind?

They’ve kindly underlined the first thing that we need to look at: we have a units mismatch.  One machine is in envelopes per minute, but the other is in envelopes per second. Continue reading